Day 1 | Tuesday, October 14


Opening  | Bertrand Badré, Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer, The World Bank Group

Welcoming Remarks  | Anabel Gonzalez, Senior Director, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice, The World Bank Group

Keynote  | Dani Rodrik, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton 


Presentation by Professor Rodrik     ||        Watch the opening session (including the Keynote)


 


Panel 1 – Measuring the Impact of the New Growth Strategies

Speakers

Andreu Mas-Collel (Minister for Economy & Knowledge, Government of Catalonia, Spain), Dani Rodrik (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton), Philippe Aghion (Harvard University) [due to family emergency, professor Aghion did not participate in the panel], Arvind Subramanian (Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Center for Global Development)

Moderator

Ivan Rossignol (Chief Technical Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice, WBG)

Themes

In many places, five to ten years have passed since the push for new growth strategies began. Given that these strategies often start with a range of coordinated actions (in a sub-jurisdiction ‘enclave’), with the hope to catalyze – indirectly – wider and greener growth, they create serious methodological and substantive issues in defining and measuring their impact. How do they fit into, or reshape, traditional growth theory? Based on that, how can we adequately assess whether they are succeeding or failing? What are the implications, for theory and practice?

Presentations 

 Presentation by Arvind Subramanian   other speakers had no presentations

      Watch the panel online

Panel 2 – Institutional Means to Support New Growth Strategies

Speakers

Dato' Sri Idris Jala (Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department and CEO of Performance Management & Delivery Unit (Pemandu), Malaysia), Arun Maira (Former Member for Industry, Planning Commission, Government of India, and Founder, India Backbone Implementation Network – IbIn), Christian Ketels (Harvard University), Charles Sabel (Columbia Law School)

Moderator

Pierre Jacquet (President, Global Development Network)

Themes

If traditional institutions struggled with ‘old’ industrial policy, in an era of less volatile and uncertain markets, they are liable to be wholly inadequate to new growth strategies. New institutions thus need to be developed, which will require new concepts, and may be demanding (even unfeasible) in their requirements on governance and political economy. In practice, what new institutions are emerging and how are they faring? What are their demands on and risks for governance? What new concepts do they require? Where could they be pursued, and where not?

Presentations 

 Presentation by Idris Jala     |      Presentation by Christian Ketels     |      Presentation by Charles Sabel

      Watch the panel online

Panel 3 – New Growth Strategies in Middle and High-Income Countries

Speakers

Didier Herbert (Director, Enterprise Competitiveness, Industry and Growth Policies, European Commission), Matthew Gilbert (Team Leader, Economic Performance & Strategy, Dept. of Treasury, New Zealand), Danny Leipziger (Managing Director, The Growth Dialogue, George Washington University)

Moderator

Bert Hofman (Country Director, China, WBG)

Themes

Job creation has been the defining challenge for developed countries as much as for developing ones since the latest financial crisis. With persisting low growth, high unemployment and rising inequality, the former have been juggling with the same key question as the latter: how does one encourage the growth of job-creating industries in an era of open trade? The European Union has recently engaged on new competitiveness and growth strategies for job creation, which integrates the new realities of globalized trade and fast innovation in offering a package to encourage investment, growth and job creation. New Zealand are currently embarking on a growth strategy with a stronger focus on lifting exports and international connections to drive higher economic performance. What are the defining features of these policies, and the key challenges in implementing them? What can developing countries learn and adapt?

Presentations 

  Presentation by Didier Herbert     |      Presentation by Matthew Gilbert     |     Presentation by Danny Leipziger

      Watch the panel online

Panel 4 – Competitive Cities: New Growth Policies & Urban Development

Speakers

Ravi Naidoo (Executive Director for Economic Development, City of Johannesburg, South Africa), Kevin Murphy (President and CEO, JE Austin, and WEF), Richard Newfarmer (Country Director: Rwanda-Uganda-South Sudan, International Growth Center)

Moderator

Ede Jorge Ijjasz-Vasquez (Senior Director, Social, Urban, Rural & Resilience Global Practice, WBG)

Themes

With rapid urbanization in much of the developing world, cities are becoming the locus of the jobs challenge, a key nexus for global trade, but are also where economic inequality is felt most starkly. Cities’ success or failure in improving livelihoods and increasing economic opportunities for their residents cuts across urban management and economic development –beyond the technical challenges of building city roads and delivering treated water. How can cities and local governments tackle income inequality and economic segregation while increasing global competitiveness? What should cities be doing more of, and what should they be doing less of? Can new high tech industries provide an answer to this challenge? What else can cities do to change their own economic trajectory?

Presentations 

 Presentation by Ravi Naidoo     |      Presentation by Kevin Murphy

      Watch the panel online

Panel 5 – Global Value Chains – Perspectives from the Private Sector

Speakers

David D. Nelson (Senior Manager, Global Government Affairs and Policy, General Electric Company), Mohsin Khalid (Executive Director, Ittehad Steel Group), Jon Hixson (Head, North American Government Relations, Global Issues Management, Cargill, Inc.)

Moderator

James Emery (Head, Global Strategy and Finance, Global Industries, Manufacturing, Agriculture and Services Department, IFC)

Themes

Directed country interventions to favor the development of some value chains, like the automotive sector, have led to mixed results. This has especially been the case in the past few decades, where value-chains have become increasingly fragmented and globalized. What is the perspective of business leaders on what drives the integration of a country as part of their global value chain? What are the main drivers for private investment, growth, and job creation in that context, and how does that depend on the value chain considered? How can new trade and competitiveness policies support GVCs to have the greatest effect on company decision-making?

Presentations 

Panelists in this session had no presentations

      Watch the panel online

Closing Remarks

Ted Chu, IFC Chief Economist, The World Bank Group

    Watch closing remarks by Ted Chu


 

 


Day 2 | Wednesday, October 15

Deep-dives on work in progress related to the themes raised during the conference


CANCELLED  Deep-dive 1 – Manufacturing in South Asia


Deep-dive 2A – Competitive Cities

Speakers

Stefano Negri, Austin Kilroy & Megha Mukim  (Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice, WBG)

Themes

How can cities generate more jobs?  Since January 2014, a multi-Practice team in the World Bank Group has been assembling evidence to support WBG task teams responding to cities’ needs. The session will:

  • Review key questions from WBG clients: “what have other cities done to achieve job creation?”; “how can better determine priorities?”; “how do I get it done?”
  • Present intermediate findings on each area, focusing on: pilot engagement in Johannesburg; global findings about city success; and the role of local governments in China.
Presentation

 Presentation


Deep-dive 2B – Making Skills Programs Work 

Speakers

Aashish Mehta (University of California-Santa Barbara), Amit Dar (Director, Education Global Practice, WBG)

Themes

Skills are a defining factor for competitiveness, and greater human capital is perhaps the most positive-sum route to reducing inequality, and hence sharing prosperity. Yet firms tend to under-provide training, while skills programs are among the most difficult to deliver in practice. Such market and government failures persist globally, but in a few cases, new cooperation models seem to have worked. Under what conditions? What role have different institutions (firms, unions, government) played? How have they been better integrated in practice?

Presentations 

 Presentation by Aashish Mehta     |      Presentation by Amit Dar


Deep-dive 3A – Climate Change and Growth Strategies

Speakers

Alexios Pantelias (Trade and Competitiveness, WBG), Thomas Kerr (Climate Change Cross-Cutting Solution Area, WBG); Jigar Shah (Executive Director, IIP)

Themes

New growth strategies can’t be decouple from the risks and opportunities presented by climate change. As mentioned by Jim Kim, this new reality in the growth agenda will shape our next development challenge. Recent reports found a number of key climate compatible policies would lead to global GDP gains of between $1.8tn and $2.6tn a year by 2030. The challenge is that climate change requires a global agenda and commitment to ensure an even playing field. This session will focus on the challenge climate change poses to growth strategies, policies that can address both challenges of ensuring growth and mitigating climate change, and examples of countries and circumstances where this is being done.

Presentations   Presentation by Jigar Shah

Deep-dive 3B – Towards an integrated WBG Tourism Solution     

Speakers

John Perrottet (WBG), Prof. Donald E. Hawkins (Eisenhower Professor of Tourism Policy, George Washington University), Alain Dupeyras (Head of Tourism, OECD), Jonathan Mitchell (Practice Leader, Coffee International)

Themes

Tourism accounts for over 9% of world GDP, 1 out of 11 jobs, and 6% of exports of least developed countries, and created 4.7 million additional jobs in 2013. This explains increasing demand from WBG clients to build their tourism industries, through public infrastructure, mobilized private sector investment, improved regulation and product offerings, skills building and development of new markets. The reorganization of the WBG provides the opportunity to define a new, integrated offer responding more comprehensively and systematically to the diverse and increasingly sophisticated needs of the tourism industry, while ensuring positive outcomes for local communities.

Presentations  forthcoming

 

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